Pamela Ross

Actress/Pianist/Writer

 

In CARREÑO
In goodbye, harry
Press Reviews
Record Reviews
Links
Conductors
Upcoming Performances
Past Performances

 

ON RECORDINGS: Purchase Pamela Ross' CDs and videos at:

*Or order the following recordings through 88 Carat Productions: 1500 Washington Street #3E, Hoboken NJ 07030:
  • Chopin: The Four Ballades
  • Chopin: The Four Scherzi
  • Schumann: Kreisleriana, Faschingsschwank aus Wien
  • Bach: Toccata in G, English Suite no.2, etc.
Download MP3 files from two (2) of Pamela Ross' CDs:
www.pamelaross.com/music

Read more about Pamela Ross at http://www.pamelaross.com/articles/tgdlc/Pamela/Pamela.html

Published articles and stories by Pamela Ross at http://www.pamelaross.com/articles/tgdlc/Pamela/Pamela.html

ON TELEVISION: A&E Television Network

  • "Breakfast with the Arts"
  • "A&E" Classroom

ON VIDEO:

Bookings/Performance Information
88 Carat Productions
1500 Washington Street
Suite #3E
Hoboken New Jersey 07030
201 239 1890

To see more concert and and one-piano show excerpts on YouTube go to:
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=pamela+ross+piano

Pamela Ross' videos are available at Amazon.com: Pamela Ross' videos and CDs are available through:

88 Carat Productions
1500 Washington Street
Suite #3E
Hoboken New Jersey 07030
201 239 1890

and Amazon.com


Prices:

CDs: $12.99/each, plus shipping and handling
Videos: $18.99/each, plus shipping and handling

To contact Pamela Ross by E-mail write toPross9@aol.com


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About Pamela Ross

Pamela Ross combines the drama of great theatre and the passion of great music to create unique and memorable evenings of musical theatre. Her one-piano shows, "CARREÑO" and "goodbye, harry" have thrilled audiences in the U.S. and abroad.

Pamela Ross was born in Louisiana and has roots in Spain and South America. She studied music at Juilliard and holds a B.A. from Queens College of the City of New York, where she was graduated Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude. Graduate studies were pursued at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she received a Master of Music degree, and her doctoral studies were done at Yale University.

When Pamela Ross isn't creating wonderfully crafted works for the stage, she is engaged as a recitalist, piano soloist and chamber music player. She has performed with some of the greatest conductors of our time including Arthur Fiedler, Jorge Mester, Murry Sidlin, and Gustav Meier. She is also a recording artist, with two Chopin albums, the Scherzi and the Ballades, and discs on the Connoisseur Society Label of piano music by Robert Schumann, and keyboard music by J.S. Bach.


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About "CARREÑO"

"CARREÑO" is based on the tempestuous life of the great turn-of-the-century Venezuelan pianist, Teresa . Known variously as "The Empress of the Keyboard" and "The Walküre of the Keyboard," Teresa Carreño earned a reputation based not only on staggering virtuosity, but on a wildly romantic lifestyle which included no less than four husbands (one of whom was the esteemed Scottish-born pianist Eugen d'Albert). Teresa Carreno held sway over romantic pianism for nearly 40 years and her life was peppered with great triumphs and tragic setbacks including the loss of a daughter whom she, as a teenage mother, was forced to put up for adoption early on in her career. Carreno's experiences as an international personality, along with her efforts to find love and reclaim her abandoned daughter, are the catalysts behind Pamela Ross' exceptionally entertaining evening of drama and music.

Carreño

"CARREÑO " was a runaway hit Off-Broadway in New York City, playing over 400 performances and receiving a coveted Outer Critics Circle Award nomination for "Outstanding Achievement." "CARREÑO" has been hailed "a unique tour de force" and continues to captivate audiences wherever it is performed.


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"CARREÑO", recently filmed by Georgia-Pacific Television Productions, won an award in the US International Film/Video Festival in Illinois in April, 1998, and a US Telly Award in May,1998.

 

What the critics say:

"MISS ROSS' ACTING IS LOW-KEY AND EARNEST ALLOWING FLASHES OF DEFIANCE AND FIERCE PRIDE... THE STORY SHE TELLS SUGGESTS AN ARTIST AS EXPANSIVE AND SELF-DRAMATIZING AS THE MUSIC SHE PLAYS WITH SUCH A FEROCIOUS VIVACITY." -THE NEW YORK TIMES

"A UNIQUE TOUR-DE-FORCE!...THE SHOW IS FASCINATING AS HISTORY AND AS PERFORMANCE. ROSS PERFORMS A TWO-HOUR SOLO RECITAL WHILE ENACTING THE PART OF THE FEISTY, NAIVE, CLEVER AND DETERMINED 19TH CENTURY WOMAN. THIS IS AN UNUSUAL PERFORMANCE ON A DIFFICULT AND INTRIGUING SUBJECT...REMARKABLE! - NEW YORK NEWSDAY

"MS. ROSS MAY WELL BE THE FIRST EXPONENT OF THE CLASSICAL MUSICAL BIOGRAPHICAL MONODRAMA." - THE NEW YORK TIMES

"A DRAMA THAT'S MUSIC TO OUR EARS...A REFRESHING CHANGE OF PACE...PAMELA ROSS, WHO PLAYS CARREÑO, IS A FORMIDABLE PIANIST. THE EVENING SOARS...BRAVO! " - THE DAILY NEWS

"CARREÑO IS A GENUINE TOUR-DE-FORCE IN WHICH MS. ROSS TACKLES ACTING, PIANO PLAYING, AND PERFORMING BOTH IN SPANISH AND IN ENGLISH. ROSS SPINS OUT THE FASCINATING AND OFTEN TRAGIC STORY OF CARRENO, INTERSPERSING HER MONOLOGUES WITH BRILLIANTLY EXECUTED INTERPRETATIONS OF CHOPIN, LISZT, BACH, MENDELSSOHN, AND OTHERS." - CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

"A FORTISSIMO PERFORMANCE BY ROSS GIVES LIFE TO ONE-WOMAN DRAMA OF PIANIST ' CARRENO'...A BRILLIANT PIANIST, AND TALENTED ACTRESS, ROSS SENDS HER AUDIENCES ALMOST INTO A MAGICAL TRANCE AS SHE PLAYS CHOPIN, MENDELSSOHN, LISZT, SCHUMANN, GRIEG, AND EVEN SCOTT JOPLIN." - NEWHOUSE SYNDICATE

" CARRENO IS AS MUCH A CLASSICAL MUSIC RECITAL AS A THEATRE PIECE. ONE IS IMPRESSED BY A PERFORMER WHO PUTS THE PASSION APPARENT IN CARRENO'S CHARACTER INTO VIBRANT RENDITIONS OF THE WORKS OF THE GREAT MASTERS. ALL OF WHICH MEANS THAT THIS IS A SHOW THAT CAN BE RECOMMENDED EQUALLY TO THEATRE AND CLASSICAL MUSIC FANS." - NEW YORK CITY TRIBUNE

"PAMELA ROSS IS BOTH AN ACTRESS AND AN IMPRESSIVE CONCERT PIANIST. HER PERFORMANCE IS SPIRITED, SAUCY, WITH FLASHES OF RUEFUL HUMOR AND INTIMATIONS OF LUST. ROSS PLAYS ENERGETICALLY , WITH FEELING, PRECISION, EVERY FILIGREE IN PLACE. TERESA CARREÑO EARNED THIS COMEBACK AND MORE !" - THE VILLAGE VOICE

"DON'T MISS ' CARRENO'...MISS ROSS IS AS RIVETING IN HER DRAMATIC PRESENTATION OF THE WOMAN AS SHE IS STUNNING IN HER MUSICAL PERFORMANCE. THE PIANIST/ACTRESS HAS SPECTACULAR TECHNIQUE THAT RIVALS MANY OF THE WORLD'S FINEST MUSICIANS. THERE IS A SOLID DRAMATIC LINE TO THE PLAY, AND THERE ARE SOME ORIGINAL DIRECTORIAL TOUCHES. THIS LITTLE PLAY IS NOT TO BE MISSED! YOU WILL REMEMBER IT LONG AFTER MANY ANOTHER BIGGER PRODUCTION HAS FADED FROM MEMORY." - THE BERGEN NEWS

"UNHESITATINGLY, GO! DRAMA AND A CONCERT ARE UNCANNILY COMBINED...WITH THE MUSICAL EXPERTISE OF PAMELA ROSS, THE EFFECT IS AS EXCITING AND ABSORBING AS THE ONRUSH OF MUSIC FILLING THE THEATRE. DON'T BE SURPRISED IF YOU RETURN WITH FRIENDS TO HEAR ROSS' SKILL INTERPRETING MENDELSSOHN, BACH, LISZT, GRIEG, MACDOWELL AND SCOTT JOPLIN'S RAGTIME. BRAVO!" - OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE

"CARRENO IS BOTH AN ENGROSSING BIOGRAPHICAL DRAMA AND RIVETING TWO-HOUR CONCERT. ROSS IS BEAUTIFUL INSINUATING AND HOT BLOODED BY BIRTH AND DESIGN. THE WORD BRAVURA WOULD NOT BE AN OVERSTATEMENT FOR THIS SURPRISINGLY EDIFYING SPECIAL EVENT." - THE DAILY RECORD

"SENSUOUS, SUPER-TALENTED PAMELA ROSS, A RENOWNED CONCERT PIANIST AND SUBSTANTIAL ACTRESS, IS VIRTUALLY SWELLING THE TINY INTAR THEATRE WITH THE POWERFUL SCOPE OF HER INTERPRETATIONS OF THE TEMPESTUOUS LIFE OF THE VENEZUELAN PIANIST TERESA CARREÑO. A ROUSING 'BRAVO' TO BOTH OF THESE FASCINATING LADIES. YOU MUST GO STRETCH YOUR SOUL WITH THE SOUND OF THEIR MAGNIFICENT MUSIC...REMARKABLE"' - SOUTH SHORE RECORD


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PAMELA ROSS ON "goodbye, harry"

My concept for a one-piano show started somewhere early in my life when my friends and family began calling me "Ham" instead of "Pam." From that time on it became my most fervent hope that I would never let anyone down. My Dad, Harry Ross, was really the original "Ham," the one from whom most of my material springs. The rest springs maternal: my mom, Elizabeth, kept us all in good spirits and good meals.

"goodbye, harry" is my own, personal tribute to a most unusual man. Harry was a selftaught artist, a musician who loved not only the classics, but jazz and contemporary music as well, a dentist, a sports enthusiast, and a quick minded man who was blessed with a delicious sense of comedy.

Harry savored every moment of his life, and then some. He left this world quickly and effortlessly, and with that same tongue-in-cheek humor: bending over the car, trying to fix a hubcap, his last words were "Doggone, the blasted thing is flat! Get me the tire pufferupper, would you?" And that was that. The rest I'm going to tell you about in the show, with the help of my piano and the blessings of my Mom. And as the ghosts of Chopin, Gershwin, Garner, Rachmaninoff and numerous distinguished others never objected to sharing the spotlight with me and Harry, they'll be there too. Enjoy!!


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PRESS REVIEW
Hoboken Progress-Hoboken, NJ

Pamela Ross makes her music in the Mile Square

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Pamela Ross makes her music in the Mile Square -Page 1   Pamela Ross makes her music in the Mile Square -Page 2


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PRESS REVIEW
The Christian Science Monitor

A Pianist's Life at the Keyboard
An American performer takes on the flamboyant persona of Venezuela's Teresa Carreno

By Amy Duncan, Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor / February 1, 1991

NEW YORK
Carreno One-woman show starring Pamela Ross. Directed by Gene Frankel. At the Intar Theatre.

A CLASSICAL musical? Yes, it is possible, when the subject of the musical is Teresa Carreno - the fiery turn-of-the-century Venezuelan pianist/composer who managed to charm Europe and the United States with her talent.

Carreno lived a life that was nothing less than scandalous in her day: four husbands (two of them brothers), seven children (one given up for adoption without Carreno's knowledge), and a never-ending schedule of continent hopping and concert tours.

American pianist/actress Pamela Ross stars as Teresa Carreno in a one-woman show here at the Intar Theater off-Broadway.

It's a genuine tour de force in which Ms. Ross tackles acting, piano playing, and performing in both Spanish and English. Does Ross pull it off?

You bet she does. She spins out the fascinating and often tragic story of Carreno's life as she sits at the piano, interspersing her monologues with brilliantly executed interpretations of Chopin, Liszt, Bach, Mendelssohn and others.

One of the most amazing things about the play is that Ross doesn't actually speak Spanish - and yet her delivery at the Spanish-language performances is practically flawless.

In a telephone interview, I asked her to explain this mystery to me.

She told me that when she was performing the play in English during the spring last year, ``A little gentleman came up from Venezuela to visit New York City and he looked up the theater directory of The New York Times and he saw ``Carreno'' and he said, oh my, our national musical heroine, it's got to be about her! So he called the Venezuelan Consulate who called me and said show up with your press kit, there's a guy here who wants to produce it in Caracas.''

SO Ross went to meet him, and he told her that his people would love to have her do the play in Venezuela - in Spanish, of course.

```Oh,' I said in my best English, `of course!''' said Ross.

Her run in New York would be finished in October, and they wanted the play to start in November in Caracas.

All the arrangements were made, and meanwhile, Ross says, ``I was in a state of purple panic. I said to myself, you're either very stupid, or you're very smart and you're going to do this.''

Ross quickly arranged for four different tutors to teach her to pronounce Spanish. Then she found someone to translate the play. When all the wrinkles were ironed out ``... I memorized it. I spent eight hours a day for six weeks, listening to myself on tapes, drilling with other people, and I did it!''

But this was only the beginning.

Off she went to Venezuela, where she was met at the airport by people from the Caracas public television, who were thrilled that a norteamericana was coming down to do a play about Teresa Carreno in their language. They stuck a microphone in her face and said, how does it feel to be here? - in Spanish, of course.

She got someone to translate for her, leaving the Venezuelans a bit puzzled by the American woman who could do the play in Spanish but couldn't speak Spanish. Then came opening night.

``I was terrified,'' says Ross. ``I was afraid that they would laugh and say, are you kidding? Yankee, go home!''

But her fears were unfounded.

``When they came backstage and started speaking to me in Spanish, I assumed I had passed the acid test.''

Ross has always been fascinated by the lives of women musicians.

Her other one-woman show, ``I, Clara,'' about the life of Clara Schumann, written with and directed by Viveca Lindfors, tours nationally, and she is currently planning her next show, based on the life of Argentine pianist Arminda Canteros.

``Carreno'' will soon be the subject of a film - an expanded version of the play.

Ross's research on Teresa Carreno began in 1987 with the help of an enthusiastic researcher at the Library of Congress. Ross plowed through everything available on the pianist - letters by her and to her, clips, and even a biography written by one of her students.

``Carreno'' revolves around the adoption of Teresa's daughter, Emilita, the child she gave birth to at age 17.

While Teresa was on tour, her husband (a musician himself), jealous of his wife's success, turned the child over to an adoption agency, and Carreno never found the girl until she was practically grown up.

By then it was too late, and Emilita rejected her.

The play opens with Carreno, at age 42, reading a letter from the girl, spurning her mother's offer of tickets to her concert. Ross admits that although the letter was a fabrication to add dramatic impact to the story, the events of Carreno's life are accurate.

Now that Ross has proved she can act in Spanish, she's decided to learn to speak it ``... so that I can go on Spanish talk shows.''

``Carreno'' runs in New York until the end of May. Thursday evening performances are in Spanish. Plans are also under way for performances in Florida, California, and Mexico.

See article at http://www.csmonitor.com/1991/0201/lcar.html


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PRESS REVIEW
Miami New Times-Miami, FL

Key Performances

By Roberta Morgan

Especially before the age of information-packed technology, historians tended to obscure a great deal. Lately, in the new decade of "the woman" (thanks, Hillary!), scholars and artists appear to be discovering a whole crop of creators previously overlooked or completely ignored. Ask for the greats of the arts and you might hear the names Mozart, Chopin, Hemingway, van Gogh. Women, particularly in theater, were prized more for their posteriors than for posterity. How many will remember, for example, that the lovely Lillie Langtry was praised for her wit A yes, wit A by such acid-penned observers as Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, and George Bernard Shaw. Of course, most people know the novelist Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin needed to adopt the name "George Sand" in order to publish her more than 90 works of literature.

In the arena of lost femme artistes, even more sinister rumblings echo forth from the past. Perhaps Brecht didn't write all his work, and some of his mistresses helped out more than a bit. What about the claim that Clara Schumann, wife of composer Robert and a virtuoso pianist in her own right, actually composed much of his music? F. Scott Fitzgerald's distraught mate, Zelda, long claimed that "Scottie" stole her stories and called them his own. More and more, reconstructive historians find disturbing shards of truth in these tales, proving that women didn't just spring alive in the Twentieth Century, but struggled to thrive artistically purely underground; perhaps thousands remain undiscovered.

Ever heard of Teresa Carreño, for instance? You should have. Long before Madonna, as Arnold Mittelman of the Coconut Grove Playhouse pointed out recently, Teresa was a superstar. In the late 1800s, playing piano all through the United States, Europe, and South America, she entertained such luminaries as presidents Abraham Lincoln and Grover Cleveland. Married four times (two husbands were brothers), the mother of a brood of children, a chain-smoker who hid a gun in her piano, Ms. Carreño became as colorful a figure to the press of her time as Ms. Ciccone has today. The analogy with Madonna would hold up perfectly, except for the fact that Teresa Carreño A at least the way classical recording and concert star Pamela Ross plays her in the Grove's production of Carreño! A possessed awe-inspiring musical genius. Ms. Ross certainly owns the great gift, too, as she breathes new life into this lost superwoman, weaving impeccable and passionate piano stylings of Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Scott Joplin, and others with a fascinating one-woman-show-monologue that traces the Venezuelan virtuoso Carreño's extraordinary life from father's prize pupil to the toast of three continents.

If you enjoy the truly superior and can afford to see just one show this year, go to Carreño, if only to hear Ms. Ross play the piano. When acting the part of Teresa, she tends to exaggerate the character a bit, but this hardly matters. The piece as an overall work of theater makes an extraordinary impact, and shows how different art forms A music, acting, and playwriting A can meld to produce a new and more fulfilling dramatic structure.

Ross plays like an angel. As Carreño's author, she writes almost as well. Tying Teresa's story together through the tale of her hunt for her lost daughter (who was put up for adoption by a vengeful hubby while she was on tour), the actress/pianist/playwright delicately exposes universal truths of talented women fighting against male prejudice and jealousy, even from their own spouses. Carreño's final personal feminist triumph is perfectly reflected in the music, as Ross acts as well if not better when speaking through those power-packed and fluid fingers. Every musical phrase truly tells a story and expresses a new emotion.

Gene Frankel, the original director of this Off-Broadway hit in the Sixties, was instrumental in establishing black theater by introducing James Earl Jones, Cicely Tyson, Louis Gossett, Jr., and Maya Angelou to the stage in his adaption of Jean Genet's The Blacks. Now he contributes just as much to the cause of women, by helping Pamela Ross maneuver a perfect one-performer concert/ play. Even if you don't care for classical music, you'll be won over by the way Ms. Ross plays it, and in the process, she'll hook you into the saga of the great Carreño. A a woman who should be remembered for her musical virtuosity and her strength of will. Arnold Mittelman must be praised highly for finding Ross's show and, through it, restoring Carreño's gifts to their rightful place in history.


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PRESS REVIEW
INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL-Lancaster, PA

Pamela Ross pays tribute to her father

To paint the truest picture of her late father, classical pianist Pamela Ross surrounds herself with his paintings, his dental instruments and, of course, his music.

In her one-woman play, "goodbye, harry," Ross invokes his spirit as well, "smashing' herself into the work with the same passion her father possessed.

In giving herself to the music of Chopin and Rachmaninoff, Gershwin and Sondheim, she lifts the audience with a loving portrait of a rare man.

She shared her memories Friday night to a full house in the Fulton's new fourth floor Studio Theatre, combining wry wit with a magnificent mix of music.

Set in Harry Ross' New York apartment on summer evening, Ross invites the audience to experience the music she grew up with, the music her father loved.

She deftly combines popular and classical pieces, blending boogiewoogie with Debussy, just as he did.

The reminiscing is more autobiographical than a biography of Harry Ross, as she reveals how her father shaped her life.

Although she may have eclipsed her father's talent technically while she was still a child by learning how to hit the right notes, she still reaches out for him in an attempt to embrace his passion.

She repeats her father's adage like a mantra! "Better to play one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep."

As king of the jungle, Ross roars.

Her interpretations of Frederic Chopin and Sergei Rachmaninoff were simply stunning Friday night as she threw her whole body into the demanding pieces until the room reverberated. The performance was quite athletic as the intensity of the notes tensed then released each muscle in her slight frame.

She simply couldn't sit still.

Launching into the spirited "Kitten on the Keys" by Zez Confrey, Ross explained her enthusiasm by noting this was the first song she ever heard her father play.

Her fierce playing was tempered with shimmering quietness as well.

Most notably, she echoed her father's watercolor painting with her rendition of Debussy's "Clair de Lune." As she played, she painted the moon's reflection across water, clear and bright.


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PRESS REVIEW
Tucson Citizen - Tucson, AZ

Say 'hi' to invisible Theatre's 'goodbye, harry'

By CHUCK GRAHAM
Citizen Drama Critic

Have you ever wished somebody would come sit down in your living room and play piano? Even though you don't have a piano?

Invisible Theatre is offering the next best thing with "goodbye, harry," a one-person evening of music and whimsy preformed by Pamela Ross. On stage is a baby grand piano, with stacks of music and packing boxes scattered here and there, a few paintings on the walls and a self-portrait of Harry Ross.

The setup is that Pamela's father Harry, a retired dentist who loved to paint pictures and play piano, has passed away. Pamela is in his apartment, taking care of the last few details.

She pauses to play Harry's piano one last time. And to tell mostly humorous stories about her father the dentist, who also had some innovative ideas about art and life.

More than half the two-act show is music, with Pamela throwing herself into playing a mix of classical, Gershwin and jazz pieces. None of this is done with the hyper-art finesse of a big name symphony concert in Centennial Hall. Pamela is an accomplished concert pianist. She knows the pieces, and she plays them.

All the classical excerpts will be familiar to everyone. Even if you hate classical music, you will know these tunes. Pamela's casually delivered comments between songs add to the intimacy of a pleasant evening.

It's clear she isn't doing any acting when she talks about missing her father. Some prerecorded voice-overs representing Harry, done by K.H. Roberts, make this beloved father seem even a bit more real.

Though Harry hated to travel, Pamela makes him sound the sort who would brighten any long, boring airplane ride. It is a colorful portrait enhanced by the music.


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PRESS REVIEW
Tucson Weekly - Tucson, AZ

MUSICAL MEMORIES

By Jana Rivera

IN A WORLD where theatre-goers are often more aware of the actions of their fellow patrons than the actors on stage, Pamela Ross is turning heads. In her one-woman show, Goodbye, Harry, now playing at Invisible Theatre, she insists on an attentive audience straight off.

"Hello," she greets us...and then actually waits for a response. She speaks as if the audience is filled with old friends, and carries the warmth of that feeling throughout the piece. She even pauses to say "bless you" when a man in the front row sneezes.

You may remember Ross from her 1994 concert and theatrical performance, Carreño; or from I, Clara, another solo dramatic work. Both pieces, written and performed by Ross, pay homage to women artists (pianists).

Now Ross is back with another one-woman show combining piano concert and theatrical monologue, based on another historical figure--Harry Ross.

"Who the hell is Harry Ross?" you ask.

OK, maybe he's not so historical. Harry Ross is Pamela Ross' father, and Goodbye, Harry is her tribute to him.

If you're wondering what could possibly entice you to spend two hours listening to some woman talk about her father, stay tuned.

For starters, Ross' tribute to her father transcends her own personal experience to apply to all father/daughter relationships. Not that we all had a relationship like hers, or even a father like hers, though by the end of the evening we might wish we had. But this sentimental journey provides a stimulus for reflection on parenting and childhood and the reasons we grow up to be the people we do.

Secondly, she tells her story with charm and humor, which she apparently inherited from Harry. "I don't trust anything that sweats through its tongue," he once told Pamela, referring to her poodle.

Harry seemed to be at once an ordinary and an extraordinary man--by day, an ordinary Long Island dentist, by night a jazz musician, classical pianist and visual artist with an extraordinary flair for humor and life.

And if you're still unconvinced, in the midst of her memories of Harry, Pamela, a concert pianist in her own right (she has performed under the baton of Arthur Fiedler, Jorge Mester and Gustav Meier), tickles the keys and entertains us with Harry's favorites--everything from boogie-woogie to classical, from Zez Confrey to Frédéric Chopin, from George Gershwin to Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Now I know I've admitted my musical ignorance in the past, but trust me, this is good stuff.

Goodbye, Harry continues with performances Tuesday through Sunday through February 11 at Invisible Theatre, 1400 N. First Ave., at Drachman Street. The Tuesday, February 6, performance will be in Spanish. Tickets are $12 and $15. Call 882-9721 for reservations and information. TW.

See article at http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tw/02-01-96/review2.htm


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RECORD REVIEW
NY Daily News -Entertainment

PAMELA ROSS Bach Keyboard Music
(Connoisseur Society CD 4201, 1:09:40)
4 DISCS

By Terry Teachout

Pamela Ross, best known for fiery romantic-piano repertory, proves no less impressive in Bach. This lovely CD contains the G Major Toccata, A Minor English Suite, E Major French Suite and A Minor Partita, all played with clarity, sensitivity and (in the slow movements) a warmly lyrical approach.

See article at http://articles.nydailynews.com/1995-05-23/entertainment/17973442_1_martino-discs-nick-charles


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Sample "CARREÑO" performances on the road:

University of California/San Diego, La Jolla,Chico, CA

College of Saint Elizabeth, Morristown, New Jersey

Complejo Teresa Carreno,Caracas, Venezuela (extended run)

Munson-Proctor-Williams Institute,Utica,NY

Societe Pro Arte Grateli, Dade Cty. Aud.,Miami

Regis College, Boston, MA.

Louisiana Arts Council,West Monroe, LA.

Coconut Grove Playhouse, Miami, FL, 3 month run (112 performances)

Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Ga.

Fulton Opera House, Lancaster, Pa., extended run

Reston Community Center Theatre, Reston, Va.

Invisible Theatre Company, Tucson, AZ, extended run in Spanish and in English, presented at the Temple of Music and Art, home of the Arizona Theatre Company

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

University of Georgia, Athens, Ga.

Nazareth Arts Center, Rochester, NY



"goodbye,harry" sample performances:

"Broadway at the Surf", Miami Beach, FL, 8 week run (64 performances).

"Off Broadway", Fort Lauderdale, FL, 8 week run (64 performances)

Fulton Opera House Studio Theatre, Lancaster, PA,extended run

Invisible Theatre Co., AZ, 5 weeks,40 performances

Jewish Theatre of New England, Boston, MA

Florida Studio Theatre Cabaret Theatre


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Links


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Conductors

When Pamela Ross isn't creating wonderfully crafted works for the stage, she is engaged as a recitalist, piano soloist and chamber music player. She has performed with some of the greatest conductors of our time including Arthur Fiedler, Jorge Mester, Murry Sidlin, and Gustav Meier. She is also a recording artist, with two Chopin albums, the Scherzi and the Ballades, and discs on the Connoisseur Society Label of piano music by Robert Schumann, and keyboard music by J.S. Bach.

Arthur Fiedler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kennedy Center: Biographical information for Murry Sidlin

Pamela Ross performing Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto #2 with Arthur Fiedler:
[View bigger]


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Upcoming Performances

Pamela Ross and friends present "BRAHMSBUSTERS!:" an afternoon of magnificent musical favorites by (mostly) BRAHMS for the whole family to enjoy!



WHEN: Sunday, March 23rd, 3:00 PM

WHERE: The Hudson School Theatre Space, 601 Park Ave, Hoboken. NJ 07030

FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS: Contact Evelyn Bonilla: (973) 943-7396

Admission: FREE

About the performers:


Pamela Ross, an award winning pianist/actress/writer/recording artist, is a veteran soloist, theatrical artist, and chamber musician. Her critically acclaimed unique one woman shows have had long runs Off Broadway and in theatres and performing arts venues around the world. "CARRENO!," her multi-award winning one person show about a night in the life of the tempestuous 19th century Venezuelan piano virtuoso Teresa Carreno, ran for 52 weeks on 42nd Street's Theatre Row, where it was performed in Spanish as well as in English. Filmed by Georgia-Pacific TV Productions for public television, it won a US Telly Award. Miss Ross has performed as soloist with major orchestras and is a recording artist with several widely distributed CDs and DVDs. Many of her programs can be seen on public television, the Arts & Entertainment TV Network, and heard regularly on classical radio stations. Pamela Ross attended Juilliard, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (MM degree) and Yale University (doctoral studies.) Her acting/playwriting studies were pursued at Ensemble Studio Theatre, Playwrights' Horizons, and Circle Repertory Theatre, NYC. She is a member of Actors' Equity Association, The Dramatists' Guild, Screen Actors Guild, and is a published fiction writer/essayist with feature articles appearing in "The New York Times." Currently she is a member of the music technology faculty at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ. Visit her at www.pamelaross.com

Violinist Christina Bouey has been hailed by the New York Times for playing "beautifully," by the New York Post..."when violinist Christina Bouey spun out that shimmering tune, I thought I died and went to heaven," and by Opera News, for playing "with exquisite, quivering beauty." Her awards and prizes include the Hugo Kortchak Award for outstanding achievement in chamber music, the Canadian National Music Festival, the Queens Concerto Competition (NYC), and the Balsam Duo Competition. Christina has performed as soloist with the Prince Edward Island Symphony, Shattered Glass in New York and the Hemenway Strings in Boston. Her solo and chamber performance credits include Carnegie Hall, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Harvard Club of New York. Christina had the privilege of playing the role of the Demonic Violinist in the musical "Heaven and Hell," which was a world premiere at the Boston Conservatory. Her past summers have been spent at Toronto Chamber Festival, Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, Pinchas Zukerman's Young Artist Program and Spoleto USA. She graduated from Manhattan School of Music (2013) with a Professional Studies Certificate in Orchestral Performance, received a Professional Studies Certificate in 2012, and a Master of Music degree in 2011. Her Bachelor of Music degree is from Boston Conservatory. Christina is also a virtuoso singer, and enjoys performing coloratura arias by Mozart, Gounod and Donizetti. She has won many prizes for her vocal expertise.

'Cellist Grace Ho, a native of Taiwan, is an active soloist and chamber musician throughout the United States and Taiwan. Grace has performed with orchestras around the world, including the Lewisville Lake Symphony Orchestra, Ho Chi Ming City Symphony Orchestra, Sun Taipei Philharmonic, Manhattan School of Music Philharmonic Orchestra, University of North Texas Chamber Orchestra, and the Greater Dallas Youth Orchestra. As a chamber musician, Grace was selected to be part of 4 groups in the Center for Chamber Music at the University of North Texas and won the Lillian Fuchs Chamber Music Competition multiple times at the Manhattan School of Music. In 2013, Grace made her Carnegie Hall debut with Shattered Glass, a 12 person string ensemble. As an orchestral musician, Grace has worked internationally under eminent conductors such as Kurt Masur, Christopher Eschenbach, and Anshel Brusilow. Grace moved to the United States at age 14 and gave her first US solo performance with the Dallas Asian American Youth Orchestra. Her many awards include first prize in the 2006 Greater Dallas Youth Orchestra Concerto Competition, youngest winner in the 2007 University of North Texas Concerto Competition, Silver Medal in the 2007 Crescendo Music Awards, and first prize in the 2011 Manhattan School of Music Concerto Competition. Festivals include ENCORE School for Strings, Boston University Tanglewood Institute, and full scholarships to Manchester Music Festival, Texas Music Festival, International Festival Institute at Round Top, Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, and Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival. Grace is currently pursuing the Doctor of Musical Arts at the Manhattan School of Music with full scholarship. She received the Bachelor of Music degree from the University of North Texas and the Master of Music degree from Manhattan School of Music, graduating with the Pablo Casals Award.

Pamela Ross, Christina Bouey and Grace Ho
Pictured in photo, left to right: Christina Bouey/violin, Grace Ho/cello, Pamela Ross/piano


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Past Performances

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:


WHO: Pamela Ross and friends present "Beauty and the 3 B-sters!" (Bach/Beethoven/Brahms,) an enjoyable family program of trios and duos by popular composers past and present.

WHEN: Sunday, April 21, 3 PM

WHERE: At The Hudson School, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken New Jersey

FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS:
Evelyn Bonilla, press contact 973 943 7396

Admission: FREE

About the performers:

New York-based cellist Joseph Gotoff is rapidly gaining attention as one of the leading musical voices of his generation. Recent accomplishments include performances with world-renowned composer and pianist Lowell Liebermann of the composer's own works, and well-received concerts in venues ranging from the City Museum of New York to Christie's auction house. Currently pursuing a Master of Music degree at Mannes College studying with Barbara Stein-Mallow, Joseph studied evolutionary biology as an undergraduate at Princeton University. Previous cello teachers include Tom Kraines and the renowned pedagogue Orlando Cole, as well as chamber music studies with members of the Brentano and Juilliard string quartets. An accomplished chamber musician, Joseph has been a participant at numerous summer festivals, including Kneisel Hall and the Castleman Quartet Program.

Violinist Katherine Liccardo is finishing her Bachelor of Music degree at Mannes College of Music studying under Laurie Smukler. As the concertmaster of the Mannes Orchestra and an avid chamber musician, Katherine has performed in venues throughout the New York area such as Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, Isaac Stern Auditorium and Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Symphony Space, the Salvation Army Theatre, Christie's Auction House, the Museum of the City of New York, among others. Katherine has participated in chamber music festivals around the country including the Manchester Music Festival, Bowdoin International Music Festival, and the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival. Katherine is a certified Suzuki violin teacher and is on the faculty of the Center for Preparatory Studies in Music at Queens College. She will be starting her Master of Music degree in the Fall of 2013.

Pamela Ross is a Hoboken-based pianist/actress/writer whose award winning one woman shows have had long runs Off Broadway and in theatres and performance arts venues around the world. She has performed as soloist with major orchestras and is a recording artist with several widely distributed CDs and DVDs. Many of her programs can be seen on public television, the Arts & Entertainment Television Network, and heard regularly on classical radio stations. Miss Ross has been on the faculty of several universities, and is presently associated with Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken,New Jersey, in the Department of Music Technology. She is a member of Actors' Equity Association, Association of Film, Television, and Recording Artists, and Screen Actors' Guild.

Pictured in the photo from left to right: Joseph Gotoff, Katherine Liccardo, Pamela Ross
Pamela Ross and Adrian Daurov
PHOTO: Norbert Wagner

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
What: NAKED IN F SHARP : AN UN-DRESS REHEARSAL


What? That's what we said! Naked in F sharp! It's a comedic musical presentation featuring pianist Pamela Ross and cellist Adrian Daurov, directed by Gabriel Hernandez
Where? At The Hudson School, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken New Jersey
When? Sunday, June 24, 3 PM
Admission: FREE

ABOUT THE SHOW:

NAKED IN F SHARP, AN UN-DRESS REHEARSAL, featuring Pamela Ross/pianist and Adrian Daurov/cellist will be presented on Sunday, June 24th, at 3 PM at The Hudson School, 601 Park Avenue at Sixth Street, Hoboken. New Jersey. After the performance, the audience is invited to participate in an informal conversation with the artists/creators. Vintage tap water will be served in environmentally friendly paper cups. The show was conceived after two successful back to back duo concerts at Lincoln Center this past December, where the two performers realized that the audience was laughing a lot. Not knowing whether the attendees were laughing at them or with them, they decided to take the chance that either way, they'd come out ahead if they moved into the realm of "theatre" and took themselves and their friendly and unfriendly detractors into the world of musical fantality= a combination of fantasy and reality. Come join them as they serve up ample portions of tangos, Brahms, Marvin "A Chorus Line" Hamlisch and others in a musical sundae on a Sunday.

Pamela Ross and Adrian Daurov

Adrian Daurov,'cellist, and Pamela Ross are giving TWO (2) concerts.


Sunday Oct. 23, 3 and 5 PM at The Hudson School Theatre, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken, NJ

Admission to these concerts is FREE. Reservations are advised, as seating is limited. For information and reservations call 201 239 1890.

The duo is also playing two (2) concerts on Sunday Dec. 18, 3 and 7 PM, at Merkin Concert Hall, Kaufman Center W. 67th and Broadway, NYC. (Lincoln Center area.)


Some tickets to the NYC concert are available FREE with accompanying vouchers to be presented at the box office on the day of the concert, in exchange for tickets. To obtain these vouchers contact Evelyn Bonilla, press agent, at evelyn.bonilla26@gmail.com, phone 973 943 7396, or email Pamela Ross at PRoss9@aol.com. Otherwise general admission is $23, seniors and students $10. The Merkin Concert Hall box office contact is 212 501 3330.

All concerts are completely different, and will feature works by Bach / Beethoven / Brahms / Debussy / Shostakovich / Bartok and others. To visit Adrian Daurov, go to www.voxarequartet.com.

Pamela Ross and Adrian Daurov

"Two Chicks and a 'Cellist," an ensemble in residence at The Hudson School in Hoboken, New Jersey, will open their fall season with a concert of trios by Brahms and Mendelssohn, and popular song arrangements.


Sunday, November 21, at 3 and 5 PM at The Hudson School Theatre, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken, NJ

Admission to these concerts is FREE. However, donations are gratefully accepted. Reservations are advised, as seating is limited. For information and reservations call 201 239 1890.

Pamela Ross, pianist, and the Voxare String Quartet, will play piano quintets of Brahms and Schumann.


Sunday May 23, at 3 and 5 PM at The Hudson School, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken, NJ
Performances are at 3 PM and 5 PM. Admission is $10, 1/2 price for seniors and students.

This concert is part of the "Two Chicks and a 'Cellist" and guests series, an ensemble in residence at The Hudson School. For information and reservations call 201 239 1890.

New York City based Voxare String Quartet formed in 2008 and has since received critical acclaim for its inventive programming, technical prowess, attention to detail, and passionate performances. Praised as being one of the most brilliant and versatile quartets of its generation,  the Voxare Quartet is half Russian, half Chicagoan, 100 percent Juilliardian and 400 percent young, enthusiastic, blessed with individual great instrumental skills (Concertonet). The New York Times recently declared that Voxare  played with precision and passion, and has twice chosen Voxare as its Classical Pick of the Week. Voxare is a frequent performer at Bargemusic in New York City where the quartet has been quartet-in-residence for two summers. Voxare is not afraid to break down the boundaries of classical music: they have made and performed their own transcriptions of popular and rock music and often perform in alternative concert venues. Voxare can be found on the soundtracks of several films shown at festivals such as Sundance and Tribeca. Voxare can be visited on the web at www.voxarequartet.com.

Bring Your Own Beethoven!


Sunday, March 21, at 3 PM and at 5 PM at The Hudson School, 601 Park Avenue, Hoboken, NJ
The concert, entitled  Bring Your Own Beethoven!, will include Beethoven s  Ghost Trio, and duos for violin and piano, and  cello and piano. Special guest will be Woody Proctor, an actor, and a student at The Hudson School, reading Beethoven s famous  Heiligenstadt Testament, a poignant and touching letter Beethoven wrote to his brothers when he was still a young man, realizing he was going to grow progressively and profoundly deaf.

2 Chicks and a 'Cellist:


October 11, Sunday, 3 and 5 PM, The Hudson School, Hoboken NJ.
Click here to hear the last 2 movements of Beethoven Sonata in A major for 'cello/piano, Pamela Ross, piano and Adrian Daurov, 'cellist.

Click here to hear Brahms Sonata excerpt for 'cello/piano, Pamela Ross, piano and Adrian Daurov, 'cellist.

December 6, Sunday, 3 and 5 PM, The Hudson School, Hoboken NJ.

For more information visit www.twochicksandacellist.com

Discount tickets for these concerts are available from The Theatre Development Fund: www.tdf.org. This wonderful subscriber organization, based in New York City, helped to promote "Carreno!" and "goodbye harry" in their successful Off Broadway runs. Join TDF to enjoy a whole "menu" of first class concerts, theatre, and entertainment events: simply go to www.tdf.org/TDF_ServicePage.aspx?id=59 and fill out an application form, or call 212-912-9770 for more information.

ABOUT TDF: Theatre Development Fund, a not-for-profit organization, was created with the conviction that the live theatrical arts afford a unique expression of the human condition that must be sustained and nurtured. TDF s twofold mission is to identify and provide support, including financial assistance, to theatrical works of artistic merit, and to encourage and enable diverse audiences to attend live theatre and dance in all their venues. Read about TDF on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre_Development_Fund


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Mirror Web Sites:

www.pamela-ross.com
www.pamelarossmusic.com

E-mail:

PRoss9@aol.com


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